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Biocom California Newsletter Article

Take a look at how this year’s Life Science Catalyst Award recipients are transforming and progressing the industry as we know it today.

Catalyst Award Winner: Elinne Becket, Ph.D.

  • 2021-11-17T20:00:00.000+0000
  • California
  • Author: Canale Communications

Catalysts are defined by their ability to provoke change or increase the rate of significant action. Scientifically speaking, catalysts often make chemical reactions more energetically efficient. Similarly, an effective leader can create greater efficiency, productivity and innovation within an organization. That’s why Biocom California has, for the last six years, recognized and honored those within the Golden State who are sparking lasting change in the life science community. These trailblazers have blended youthful exuberance with a veteran presence to usher in the future of healthcare. Take a look at how this year's Life Science Catalyst Award recipients are transforming and progressing the industry as we know it today.


Elinne Becket, Ph.D. | Assistant Professor in Biological Sciences at California State University San Marcos

At California State University San Marcos (CSUSM), Elinne is driven by a clear mission: to provide ample opportunities to the students who need them most. With her platform as an assistant professor working in bacterial genomics, coupled with her in-depth experience in the biotech industry, Elinne is the ideal candidate to accomplish just that. She actively works to help expose first-generational college students to the life science industry at large through many different mediums, including workshops, networking events, collaborations and anything else that helps overcome the gatekeeping often preventing these students from excelling in their careers. “The regional life science workforce does not reflect the community it resides in or that of the CSUSM student population, and it is my mission to combat implicit bias and make the life science industry realize that everyone is what a scientist looks like,” Elinne says. When she’s not breaking down walls for tomorrow’s scientists, Elinne can be found riding her motorcycle – one of her favorite pastimes for more than 16 years, which even included serving as president of the UCLA Bruin Motorcycle Association. lse that helps overcome the gatekeeping often preventing these students from excelling in their careers. “The regional life science workforce does not reflect the community it resides in or that of the CSUSM student population, and it is my mission to combat implicit bias and make the life science industry realize that everyone is what a scientist looks like,” Elinne says. When she’s not breaking down walls for tomorrow’s scientists, Elinne can be found riding her motorcycle – one of her favorite pastimes for more than 16 years, which even included serving as president of the UCLA Bruin Motorcycle Association.