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BioCommunique Article

With ballots still being counted more than a week after people went to the polls, the current tally stands at 31 Democrats to 9 Republicans.

State Legislature Results

  • 2020-11-12T21:00:00.000+0000
  • California
  • Author: Jimmy Jackson

While this year’s election brought much drama at the federal and regional levels, the way business is done in Sacramento is not likely to change greatly because of the results of Tuesday’s election, as Democrat to Republican ratios stayed largely the same in both houses of the legislature. No statewide California offices were up in this election, so all the action fell to the Legislature.

Going into the election, the California State Senate had 29 Democrats to 11 Republicans. As of this writing, with ballots still being counted more than a week after people went to the polls, the current tally stands at 31 Democrats to 9 Republicans, with Republicans leading in two others that are too close to project a winner. In this house, two Republican incumbents lost their races. A notable newcomer will be Senator-Elect Josh Becker, who will take the seat of retiring Senator Jerry Hill, a tireless advocate for the life science industry. Senator-Elect Becker will represent this district, whose boundaries include South San Francisco to the north down through Mountain View to the south, a very large portion of the Bay Area life science cluster.

In the State Assembly, Democrats are currently at their pre-election tally of 61 versus 17 Republicans and 1 Independent, with one undetermined race in Orange County where the Democrat incumbent continues to lead her Republican opponent by a small margin. The newcomer to watch in this house will be San Diego’s own Assemblyman-Elect Chris Ward, who is a Johns-Hopkins trained neuroscientist who gave up bench work to pursue a passion in policy.

Going forward, this means Democrats continue to control the Governor’s office while holding very strong supermajorities in both the Assembly and Senate. This is important in that Democrats can pass bills requiring a supermajority, including the budget and such issues as raising taxes, without the need to court Republican votes.